How to Find an Attorney in Nevada

Consumer dissatisfaction with lawyers is on an all time high all over the United States, Nevada included. It is thus not only a matter of getting a Nevada attorney; rather it is more about finding an attorney who is honest, reliable and capable of handling the case at hand. The numerous specialties that law as a profession offers has made it even more difficult for a layman to clearly identify and find an attorney who will be able to adequately represent him. The task of finding a Nevada attorney need not be all gloomy though. There are several places, books, or people can greatly assist in finding a Nevada attorney. They include but are not limited to;

Get some personal referral

A good word from someone who has dealt with a particular attorney has long been considered one of the best and most reliable ways to find an attorney. You will get firsthand information on the speed and level of professionalism displayed by the attorney. In most instances clients are usually very objective in their analysis of previous interactions with an attorney.

Check media advertisement

Ever since the Bates Vs State bar of Arizona case that allowed attorneys to advertise their services; various media platforms like newspapers like Nevada Appeal, radio, magazines like Nevada Magazine do have various attorneys advertising their services. This medium should be dealt with carefully as it is difficult to fully infer the capability of an attorney solely from advertisements placed in the media. These advertisements should make finding a Nevada attorney easier only to the extent that it provides a list of attorneys that can be contacted then vetted.

Using Published Directories

The US in general and Nevada in particular have several directories that offer detailed information about attorneys. A good example of a directory one may use to find an attorney in Nevada is the Martindale Hubbell Law directory. It is an annual listing that has names of attorneys, dates of birth, level of education attained, universities attended and the years spent there; it has also a section that deals with the areas of specialization the attorney can handle and his skills rating. This directory is a one stop shop and it is available in public libraries and online. It is important to note though that not all attorneys are listed in this directory.

Referral from the State bar of Nevada.

This is achieved by visiting the state bar of Nevada website and then going to the lawyer referral and information service section. They will provide the client with a list of qualified attorneys who practice within Nevada. The client can then visit the one nearest and have a small discussion regarding the case they have. The attorneys will charge some very minimal fee for this consultation where they will advice the client on the viability of the case and the best way going forward.

Use the internet

The internet offers a huge pool of attorneys. A quick Google search titled finding an attorney in Nevada will offer links to numerous websites that will have contacts and addresses of attorneys in Nevada, willing and ready to serve. This approach though tedious and time consuming; has worked for very many people seeking services of an attorney in Nevada and far beyond.

5 Critical Mistakes Often Made When Hiring an Attorney & How to Avoid Those Mistakes

Stand-In Attorneys Don’t Hold Water in Some Courts

Today with the increased bankruptcy filings throughout the Nation, attorneys are changing the way the run their practices. The model that is being developed does not sit well with many including the courts.

When a client comes in and meets with an attorney and then signs a representation agreement, that may be the last time, the file or that attorney even touches the file. Clients need to be sure to question the attorney to be sure that the attorney is doing more than meeting and turning over the file to an associate or paralegal. It is also key to ask whether that attorney will appear with you in Court matters, e.g. Meeting of Creditors.

The Courts have noted that they do not approve of this “model” of attorneys office practices.

In a recent opinion by Judge Jeff Bohn (Consumer Bankruptcy News – Volume 23, Issue 19) he stated:

“The use of appearance attorneys deprives clients… Such a practice is insulting to the client, the Court, and the principles upon which the judicial system is built. Attorneys are not fungible. Attorneys are not all equal to each other, either in their courtroom abilities, their understanding of the law, or in their communicative skills.”

Clients choose a firm and an attorney for a reason, and clients have a right to be represented by the attorney of their choice during all portions of their case.

The justification for certain consumer bankruptcy attorneys that their business model will not work unless they are allowed to use appearance attorneys HOLDS NO WATER with this Court. If a firm’s business model conflicts with the professional standards of the legal profession, the former must give way to the latter.”

Be sure to ask when you interview or have your first meeting with an attorney, who will be handling my case?

  • An assistant,
  • Another attorney,
  • Appearance attorney???

When an attorney takes a case, they should initially meet with the client to understand and become familiar with the client’s needs. After that time, a Representation Agreement is agreed upon and signed.

As for Bankruptcies, there are many important deadlines and criteria to meet to finalize what type of bankruptcy is right for the client. During this time, a learning period begins for the attorney where he/she becomes very familiar with the case and interacts closely with the clients.

As the information and data are collected from the client, the attorney is able to fully understand not only the client but also the details of the case. Most of the time, there is a great deal of interaction between the client and the attorney. Much is learned about the client’s financial situation, spending habits, debts, how the debts occurred and the household income, etc.

At the 341(a) Meeting of Creditor’s is scheduled, the attorney presents his client to the Trustee and is there to assist and explain the petition that was put together for the client.

If an attorney who worked on the case does not come to Meeting of Creditors but sends an alternate attorney, how can that alternate attorney/stand-in attorney provide the proper representation and support to that client?

I don’t recommend having someone stand-in for an attorney when dealing with bankruptcy cases. Do you?